Cardinals created by Boniface VIII

Pope Boniface VIII (r. 1294–1303) created 15 new cardinals in five consistories:

Contents

1 Consistory at the beginning of 1295
2 Consistory of 17 December 1295
3 Consistory of 4 December 1298
4 Consistory of 2 March 1300
5 Consistory of 15 December 1302
6 Sources

Consistory at the beginning of 1295[edit]

Benedetto Caetani, nephew of the Pope – cardinal-deacon of SS. Cosma e Damiano, † 14 December 1296

Consistory of 17 December 1295[edit]

Giacomo Tomassi-Caetani, O.F.M., nephew of the Pope – cardinal-priest of S. Clemente, † 1 January 1300
Francesco Napoleone Orsini – cardinal-deacon of S. Lucia in Orthea. † 1312.
Giacomo Gaetani Stefaneschi – cardinal-deacon of S. Giorgio in Velabro, † 23 June 1341
Francesco Caetani, nephew of the Pope – cardinal-deacon of S. Maria in Cosmedin, † 16 May 1317
Pietro Valeriano Duraguerra, vicechancellor of the Holy Roman Church – cardinal-deacon of S. Maria Nuova, † 17 December 1302.

Consistory of 4 December 1298[edit]

Gonzalo García Gudiel, archbishop of Toledo – cardinal-bishop of Albano, † in December 1299.
Teodorico Ranieri, elect of Pisa, camerlengo of the Holy Roman Church – cardinal-priest of S. Croce in Gerusalemme, then (13 June 1299) cardinal-bishop of Città Papale, † 7 December 1306.
Niccolò Boccasini, O.P., master general of the Order of Preachers – cardinal-priest of S. Sabina (received the title on 25 March 1299), then cardinal-bishop of Ostia e Velletri (2 March 1300); became Pope Benedict XI on 22 October 1303, † 7 July 1304
Riccardo Petroni, vicechancellor of the Holy Roman Church – cardinal-deacon of S. Eustachio, † 10 February 1314.

Consistory of 2 March 1300[edit]

Leonardo Patrasso, relative of the Pope, archbishop of Capua – cardinal-bishop of Albano, † 7 December 1311.
Gentile Partino, O.F.M. – cardinal-priest of SS. Silvestro e Martino, † 27 October 1312.
Luca Fieschi – cardinal-deacon of S. Maria in Via Lata, † 31 January 1336.

Consistory of 15 December 1302[edit]

Pedro Ispano, bishop of Burgos – cardinal-bishop of Sabina, † 20 December 1310.
Giovanni Mincio da Morrovalle, O.F.M., master general of the Order of Friars Minor – cardinal-bishop of Porto e S. Rufina, † in August 1312

Sources[edit]

The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
Konrad Eubel, Hierarchia Catholica, vol. I, 1913

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Asinovsky District

Asinovsky District
Асиновский район (Russian)

Location of Asinovsky District in Tomsk Oblast

Coordinates: 57°00′N 86°09′E / 57.000°N 86.150°E / 57.000; 86.150Coordinates: 57°00′N 86°09′E / 57.000°N 86.150°E / 57.000; 86.150

Yaya River, Asinovsky District

Location

Country
Russia

Federal subject
Tomsk Oblast[1]

Administrative structure (as of October 2012)

Administrative center
town of Asino[1]

Inhabited localities:[1]

Cities/towns
1

Rural localities
39

Municipal structure (as of May 2005)

Municipally incorporated as
Asinovsky Municipal District[2]

Municipal divisions:[2]

Urban settlements
1

Rural settlements
6

Statistics

Area
5,943.3 km2 (2,294.7 sq mi)[citation needed]

Population (2010 Census)
36,459 inhabitants[3]

• Urban
70.3%

• Rural
29.7%

Density
6.13/km2 (15.9/sq mi)[4]

Time zone
KRAT (UTC+07:00)[5]

Official website

Asinovsky District on WikiCommons

Asinovsky District (Russian: А́синовский райо́н) is an administrative[1] and municipal[2] district (raion), one of the sixteen in Tomsk Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast. The area of the district is 5,943.3 square kilometers (2,294.7 sq mi).[citation needed] Its administrative center is the town of Asino.[1] Population: 36,459 (2010 Census);[3] 12,911 (2002 Census);[6] 16,222 (1989 Census).[7] The population of Asino accounts for 70.3% of the district’s total population.[3]
References[edit]
Notes[edit]

^ a b c d e Law #271-OZ
^ a b c Law #193-OZ
^ a b c Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). “Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1” [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года (2010 All-Russia Population Census) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
^ The value of density was calculated automatically by dividing the 2010 Census population by the area specified in the infobox. Please note that this value is only approximate as the area specified in the infobox does not necessarily correspond to the area of the entity proper or is reported for the same year as the population.
^ Правительство Российской Федерации. Федеральный закон №107-ФЗ&#

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Parish Church of St Mary and St Petroc

Coordinates: 50°28′09″N 4°42′56″W / 50.4692°N 4.7155°W / 50.4692; -4.7155
The Parish Church of St Mary and St Petroc is a congregation of the Roman Catholic Church in Bodmin, Cornwall, United Kingdom. The parish church is the former monastic church of the Abbey of St Mary, a community of canons regular, whose origins on the site date back to the Middle Ages.

Contents

1 History

1.1 The abbey
1.2 The parish

2 References

History[edit]
The village of Bodmin (which means “home of monks” in Cornish). A medieval Life of St Petroc describes how it was home to a hermit, St Goran (or Wron), during the early 6th century. In 518 he welcomed the Irish monk, St Petroc, who was seeking to found a monastery in the area, which he did near Padstow. The destruction caused to the monastery in 981 by Viking raiders caused the monks to move their community to Bodmin.[1]
The abbey[edit]
The Priory of St Mary was established by the Canons Regular of the Lateran during the 12th century. It grew to become the largest monastic community in Cornwall, but was suppressed on 27 February 1538 in the course of the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The buildings of the priory were torn down, with the exception of the priory church, which was converted to the use of the Church of England.[1]
The open practice of the Catholic faith in the town did not become possible again until a Catholic priest, William Young, bought some property in the town and had a Catholic church, with adjoining rectory, built in 1845. The availability of services, however, remained occasional and infrequent until 1881, when the Lateran canons were allowed to return to the region, their first modern foundation in the United Kingdom after the Dissolution, under the authority of the Bishop of Plymouth, William Vaughan.[1]
A small community of the Order was then sent from Italy and re-established the priory under the leadership of Dom Felix Menchini, C.R.L., accompanied by Dom Jean Giraud, C.R.L., and Brother Giovanni Baptista Pastorelli. By 1884, the new community had grown to 20 members, and Menchini was officially constituted as prior and Novice Master of St. Mary’s Priory, Bodmin, as well as Missionary Vicar of the diocese in charge of the Bodmin and Truro missions.[2]
As their numbers and presence continued to expand, the canons took a major role in serving the surviving Catholic population of Cornwall. The community grew, until the house was raised to the status of an abbey in 1953.
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Lovčice (Hradec Králové District)

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Lovčice

Village

Flag

Coat of arms

Country
Czech Republic

Region
Hradec Králové

District
Hradec Králové

Commune
Hradec Králové

Municipality
Chlumec nad Cidlinou

Elevation
222 m (728 ft)

Coordinates
50°9′56″N 15°23′10″E / 50.16556°N 15.38611°E / 50.16556; 15.38611Coordinates: 50°9′56″N 15°23′10″E / 50.16556°N 15.38611°E / 50.16556; 15.38611

Area
10.25 km2 (3.96 sq mi)

Population
655 (2006-07-03)

Density
64/km2 (166/sq mi)

First mentioned
1299

Mayor
Josef Dvořáček

Timezone
CET (UTC+1)

 - summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Postal code
503 61

Location in the Czech Republic

Wikimedia Commons: Lovčice

Statistics: statnisprava.cz

Lovčice is a village in the Czech Republic.

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Towns and villages of Hradec Králové District

Babice
Barchov
Běleč nad Orlicí
Benátky
Blešno
Boharyně
Černilov
Černožice
Čistěves
Divec
Dobřenice
Dohalice
Dolní Přím
Habřina
Hlušice
Hněvčeves
Holohlavy
Hořiněves
Hradec Králové
Hrádek
Humburky
Hvozdnice
Chlumec nad Cidlinou
Chudeřice
Jeníkovice
Jílovice
Káranice
Klamoš
Kobylice
Kosice
Kosičky
Králíky
Kratonohy
Kunčice
Ledce
Lejšovka
Lhota pod Libčany
Libčany
Libníkovice
Librantice
Libřice
Lišice
Lodín
Lochenice
Lovčice
Lužany
Lužec nad Cidlinou
Máslojedy
Měník
Mlékosrby
Mokrovousy
Myštěves
Mžany
Neděliště
Nechanice
Nepolisy
Nové Město
Nový Bydžov
Obědovice
Ohnišťany
Olešnice
Osice
Osičky
Petrovice
Písek
Prasek
Praskačka
Předměřice nad Labem
Převýšov
Pšánky
Puchlovice
Račice nad Trotinou
Radíkovice
Radostov
Roudnice
Sadová
Sendražice
Skalice
Skřivany
Sloupno
Smidary
Smiřice
Smržov
Sovětice
Stará Voda
Starý Bydžov
Stěžery
Stračov
Střezetice
Světí
Syrovátka
Šaplava
Těchlovice
Třebechovice pod Orebem
Třesovice
Urbanice
Vinary
Vrchovnice
Všestary
Výrava
Vysoká nad Labem
Vysoký Újezd
Zachrašťany
Zdechovice

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Kazi Magomed–Astara–Abadan pipeline

Kazi Magomed–Astara–Abadan pipeline

Location

Country
Azerbaijan, Iran

General direction
north-south

From
Kazi Magomed, Azerbaijan

Passes through
Astara (Azerbaijan), Astara (Iran), Rasht, Tehran

To
Abadan (Bid-Boland), Iran

General information

Type
natural gas

Partners
SOCAR, National Iranian Gas Company

Commissioned
1970

Technical information

Length
1,474.5 km (916.2 mi)

Maximum discharge
10 billion cubic meters per year

The Kazi Magomed–Astara–Abadan pipeline is a natural gas pipeline from Kazi Magomed in Azerbaijan to Iran.
History[edit]
The pipeline was agreed between Iran and the Soviet Union in 1965.[1] It was inaugurated in October 1970 in Astara by Mohammad Rezā Shāh Pahlavi and Nikolai Podgorny, Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet.[2] In 1971–1979, Southern Caucasus republics of the Soviet Union were supplied through this pipeline by natural gas from Iran.[3] After Iranian Revolution Iranian supplies were cut off.[4]
In 2006, Azerbaijan began a swap deal with Iran, providing gas through the Baku-Astara line to Iran; while Iran supplies Nakhchivan. On 11 November 2009, the State Oil Company of Azerbaijan (SOCAR) and National Iranian Gas Company signed a memorandum according to which Azerbaijani will supply starting from 2010 500 million cubic meters of natural gas per year.[5]
Technical features[edit]
The overall length of the pipeline is 1,474.5 kilometres (916.2 mi), of which 296.5 kilometres (184.2 mi) in Azerbaijan. The pipe diameter is 1,020 millimetres (40 in) and it had original capacity of 10 billion cubic meters of natural gas per year at 55 standard atmospheres (5,600 kPa).[5] The Iranian section of the pipeline is known as IGAT1.
References[edit]

^ Hiro, Dilip (1987). Iran under the ayatollahs. Routledge. p. 280. ISBN 978-0-7102-1123-1. Retrieved 2009-11-26. 
^ Chubin, Shahram; Zabih, Sepehr (1974). The foreign relations of Iran: a developing state in a zone of great-power conflict. University of California Press. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-520-02683-4. 
^ Staar, Richard Felix (1991). Staar, Richard Felix; Drachkovitch, Milorad M.; Gann, Lewis H., eds. Yearbook on international communist affairs. 235 (25 ed.). Hoover Institution Press. p. 483. ISBN 978-0-8179-9161-6. 
^ Wilson, David (1983). The demand for energy in the Soviet Union. Taylor & Francis. p. 36. Retrieved 2009-11-26. 
^ a b E.
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Washington Treaty

The Treaty of Washington may refer to:

Treaty of Washington (1805), between the U.S. and the Creek National Council (Muscogee (Creek))
Treaty of Washington (1824), two Indian nation treaties, between the U.S. and the Sac (Sauk) and Meskwaki (Fox) (7 Stat. 229), and the Iowa (7 Stat. 231)
Treaty of Washington (1826), between the U.S. and the Creek National Council led by Opothleyahola
Treaty of Washington, with Menominee (1831), between the U.S. and the Menominee Indian tribe
Treaty of Washington (1836), a U.S.–Native American (Ottawa and Chippewa) treaty
Webster–Ashburton Treaty of 1842. It settled the border dispute between Canada and the Eastern States, such as Maine and Vermont. It helped to end the slave trade
The Oregon Treaty of 1846, which established the US–British frontier west of the Rocky Mountains (today’s US–Canada boundary)
Treaty of Washington (1855), between the U.S. and Ojibwa
The Treaty of Washington (1871), a general agreement between the United States and the British Empire
The International Meridian Conference of 1884 in Washington DC, establishing the Greenwich Meridian, the world time zone system and the universal day as international standards
The Treaty of Washington (1900) between Spain and the United States
The Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 that limited naval armaments
The North Atlantic Treaty of 1949 that created NATO
The Treaty of Washington (1989), Treaty on Intellectual Property in respect of integrated circuits
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, better known as CITES

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Washington Treaty.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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